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The Kremlin’s Favorite Right-Wing Radical Dies in Police Shootout

Ukrainian right-winger Oleksandr Muzychko was a larger-than-life figure who was videotaped carrying a machine gun into a government building and grabbing a prosecutor by the collar while he screamed profanities into the official's face.  

On Monday night, Muzychko's life came to a suitably Hollywood-style end when he was killed by police in Rivne, a city in western Ukraine. The cops had tried to arrest Muzychko -- also known by his nom-de-guerre, "Sashko Bily" -- when he tried to evade capture by jumping through a window clad in an Oakland Raiders jacket. Muzychko fired on police and died in the ensuing shootout.

"At the moment of arrest, at shouts of "Stop! Police!", Muzychko fled, jumping through a window, and opened fire," Volodymyr Yevdokimov, Ukraine's first deputy interior minister, said during a press conference in Kiev. The police, he said, then returned fire and killed Muzychko, a leader of the radical right-wing group Pravy Sektor, or "Right Sector."

   

Prior to his death, Muzychko had featured heavily in Kremlin attempts to portray the protest movement that toppled the government of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych as a gang of fascists. Right Sector, the group he helped lead, played a key role in the protests by supplying many of the footsoldiers who battled police in the streets of Kiev. Muzychko became Moscow's favorite thug, and the Kremlin-backed news service RT happily chronicled the Ukrainian bully's misdeeds.

That Muzychko met his death in a violent showdown with police is a fitting death for a man who carefully cultivated a reputation for using force to settle disputes and intimidate his opponents. In February, Muzychko attempted to strong-arm a local prosecutor after hearing a murder investigation was proceeding slowly.  "Shut the fuck up, you bitch! Your fucking time is over," Muzychko told the prosecutor, holding him by his tie the entire time. The episode was captured on video:   

The same month, Muzychko showed up at the Rivne regional parliament brandishing a machine gun and demanding that the assembled politicians help the families of anti-government protesters killed in clashes with riot police. "Who wants to take away my machine-gun? Who wants to take away my gun? Who wants to take away my knives? I dare you!" Again, the episode was captured on video: 


In death, as in life, Muzychko is proving deeply controversial. According to independent lawmaker Oleksander Doniy, the right-wing extremist was in fact assassinated.  "Two vehicles cut off his car. He was dragged out and put in one of them," Dony claimed in a post on Facebook. "Then he was thrown on the ground, hands cuffed behind his back, two shots to the heart." Local media outlets, meanwhile, report that some residents of Rivne believe Muzychko was killed by a "Russian subversive group."

Earlier this month, Muzychko released a YouTube video in which he accused Ukrainian authorities of plotting to kill or capture him and hand him over to Russia, where he is wanted for allegedly killing and torturing some 20 Russian soldiers while fighting alongside Chechen rebels in the mid-1990s. "I am not afraid of death," he says in the video, warning that his "friends, brothers, patriots" would take up his cause.

Sure enough, fellow members of Pravy Sektor have already pledged to avenge their leader. "We will take revenge on [acting Interior Minister] Arsen Avakov for the death of our brother," said Roman Koval, a Pravy Sektor coordinator for the Rivne region. "The shooting of Sashko Bily is an assassination ordered by the minister."

EPA/PETRO HROMYH

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Hey Corrupt Chinese Billionaire, For $4 Million You Too Can Be a Cypriot Citizen

Desperate to inject some capital in their struggling economies, cash-strapped European countries are turning to a new scheme to attract investors' dollars -- so-called "Golden Visas." Since 2012, Portugal, Spain, Cyprus, and Greece have all established such programs to lure wealthy foreigners to spend their hard currency in Europe. The quid pro quo goes as follows: you invest hundreds of thousands of euros into our economy; we'll give you residence.

According to the BBC, Portugal alone has issued 734 golden visas -- the majority going to Chinese citizens -- generating more than 440 million euros.

But let's say you're a transient millionaire looking for new haunts, yet the Mediterranean just isn't your thing. Don't fret! Countries across the world offer similar programs -- often called investor visas. Navigating the opaque world of elite immigration is no easy task, but here are some of the options for the aspiring expats of the 1 percent for buying residency around the world.



COST OF "GOLDEN VISA" IN DOLLARS


Australia
The "significant investor" visa offers temporary residency for a period of four years for those who invest AUD 5 million ($4.37 million).

Antigua & Barbuda
Citizenship is available for those who invest $1.5 million in an approved business, $400,000 in real estate, or donate $250,000 to the country's National Development Fund, which develops small business enterprises.

Bahamas
Permanent residency is available to foreigners who purchase residential property worth at least $500,000.

Bulgaria
Citizenship is available to foreigners who invest 500,000 euros ($690,000).

Cyprus
Citizenship is available to foreigners who invest 5 million euros ($4.13 million) or have 5 million euros ($4.13 million) in bank deposits.

Germany
Temporary residency is available for foreigners who invest 250,000 euros ($280,000) into a German business.

Greece
Renewable five-year residency visas are available foreigners who purchase residential real estate worth at least 250,000 euros ($328,000).

Hong Kong
Temporary residency is available to foreigners who put HKD 10 million ($1.2 million) into government-approved investment plans. One caveat for those who hail from mainland China: They are required to hold permanent residency in another country. 

Hungary
Permanent residency is available to foreigners who invest 300,000 euros ($410,000) in government bonds.

Ireland
Renewable residency visas are available to non-European Economic Area* citizens who invest 500,000 euros ($690,000) into a business, approved fund, or "public project."

Latvia
Temporary residency is available for non-European Economic Area citizens who purchase property worth 150,000 euros ($206,000).

Macedonia
Citizenship is available to foreigners who invest 400,000 euros ($550,000) in the country's economy and hire at least 10 workers.

Malta
Citizenship is available to foreigners for a flat fee of 650,000 euros ($895,000).

Netherlands
Temporary residency permits are available to foreigners who invest at least 1.25 million euros ($1.7 million) in Dutch companies.

New Zealand
Temporary residency is available to foreigners who invest from $1-7 million, depending on the program of investment.

Panama
Permanent residence is available to foreigners who maintain a deposit of $260,000 in the National Bank of Panama for a period of 5 years.

Portugal
Residency is available for foreigners who invest 1 million euros ($1.38 million), purchase property worth at least 500,000 euros ($690,000), or create 10 jobs.

Singapore
Permanent residency is available to foreigners who invest SGD 2.5 million ($2 million) for a period of five years.

St. Kitts and Nevis
Citizenship is available to foreigners who invest $400,000 in real estate or donate $250,000 to the country's Sugar Industry Diversification Foundation -- a fund that assists the government in diversifying the economy.

Switzerland
Temporary residence is available to foreigners by paying an annual taxation fee. Cost is determined by canton, the country's states, with a minimum fee of 150,000 Swiss Francs ($170,000) annually. 

Spain
Residential permits are available to foreigners who invest 500,000 euros ($690,000) in property.

United States
EB-5 immigrant visas, which allow conditional residency, are available to foreigners who invest at least $1 million in a new or recently created business, or $500,000 for businesses in rural or high-unemployment areas.

United Kingdom
Temporary residency visas are available to non-European Economic Area citizens who invest £1 million ($1.65 million) for a period of five years.

* The European Economic Area unites the member states of the European Union with Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein. It allows the non-EU member states to participate in the EU's internal market.